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  1. mickey_moussaoui

    February 25th, 2013

    I’ll bet there are NO squirrels…or small dogs, or house cats or rabbits either.

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  2. JustAl

    February 25th, 2013

    My town adjoins Carrollton, I’ve only seen one, briefly while bicycling at dawn in our park. Squirrels and rabbits are readily available for these guys.

    Come to think of it, you don’t see any stray cats or dogs here either. . .

    Could be worse, lots of Cougars in OK, (not the ones with Botox).

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  3. Chieftain

    February 25th, 2013

    We have urbanized coyotes in our neighborhood here. People leave all kinds of pet food out so they eat very well.

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  4. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    As a guy who gets called sometimes when they show up. Yes. If they do come in deep it is along the railroad tracks they have a safe path to travel in and out. I have customers along R.R tracks with cats whose tails got “bobbed” if they didn’t disappear.

    They, coyotes and hawks/falcons/owls are acclimating themselves to the urban landscape here. The living is easier and bountiful compared to open fields.

    People usually mistake the bobcats for very large cats and the coyotes as skinny mix breeds gone feral.

    I was trapping for skunks last Winter and was told to not catch the raccoons. Kinda like surgical trapping. I put trail cams up on the traps to see what I was dealing with.

    Skunks, raccoons, armadillo, quite a variety showed up to check things out. The day a bobcat walked through, though, there were no other animals showing up on camera for hours.

    I use dry cat food often for bait with skunks and raccoons. The bobcat never even snuffled the dry cat food. What I was trying to catch was his kitty food.

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  5. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    Hi JustAl. We be neighbors!

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  6. demonrat dave

    February 25th, 2013

    When it snows do they go bobsledding?

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  7. Corona

    February 25th, 2013

    My mother was right. They Do sound just like kids crying.

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  8. Czar of Defenestration

    February 25th, 2013

    “You Mean These Just Roam Neighborhoods in Texas, Like Squirrels?”

    Yes…except they bury *your* nuts.

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  9. MadJack

    February 25th, 2013

    One more reason to move to Texas! :mrgreen: :cool:

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  10. Racist

    February 25th, 2013

    Alec Baldwin says he’s got coons roaming the streets in his neighborhood. But is it racist to call them cats cats? What about Dawgs? I’m confrused now!

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  11. Johnny Freedom

    February 25th, 2013

    I love bobcats, but a couple of big specimens like that in a residential area need to be put down – it’s too dangerous to have large predators who are obviously not afraid of people around.

    I see those two and think of my 3 year old playing just over the 6-foot privacy fence they can easily jump.

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  12. iamthegps

    February 25th, 2013

    Out where I live in OK we have lots of cougars, but you can only spot their tracks after it rains. They’re real good at hiding. I’m glad they’re coming back, though; I’ve always liked them and (by and large) they’re not a danger to humans. Plus it’s fun to freak people out and tell them we’ve got cougars around here. XD

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  13. spymyeyes

    February 25th, 2013

    Any preditor that can take down a child should be either trapped and relocated back to the wild, or put down for human safety concerns.

    Besides, between those two “cats” I could make me a REAL nice scarf or coat or pairs of slippers or….

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  14. MM

    February 25th, 2013

    Yikes

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  15. Stirrin the BS

    February 25th, 2013

    I’m with Johhny Freedom – those cats need to be put down immediately. Animals that far up the food chain need to know, without a doubt, that roaming in a populated neighborhood is dangerous to their existence.

    If the local police won’t do it, the residents need to take matters into their own hands – despite local gun ordinances.

    (yes, I make that bold statement behind the safety of my computer screen ;) )

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  16. Cruisin Cat

    February 25th, 2013

    A former friend shot one of these while deer hunting and had it made into a rug for his bar in his house.
    That’s one of the reasons he’s a former friend.

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  17. JustAl

    February 25th, 2013

    Hi Dadof3 from Coppell!

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  18. Bad Brad

    February 25th, 2013

    Statistically, much safer then Pitt Bulls.

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  19. Reverend Darkness

    February 25th, 2013

    I live just South East of the D/FW area, and we have more coyotes and wild pig, but a few ‘cats have been spotted here and there.

    – Coyotes will run from you. No problem.
    – Bobcats will run if you are bigger than they are. They should be relocated or put down as quickly as possible.
    – Wild pig is the only thing in the ENTIRE Great State of Texas that scares the beejeezus out of me. I’ve seen them take the tires out on a Dodge Dually just because it was a Tuesday. There’s a reason that it’s open hunting on those hell-spawn.

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  20. Bad Brad

    February 25th, 2013

    Reverend, Those piggies are pretty tasty.

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  21. Stranded in Sonoma

    February 25th, 2013

    They sound just like Chris Matthews and Soledad O’Brien discussing the SOTU speech.

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  22. AbigailAdams

    February 25th, 2013

    We’ve got lots of urban ‘coons in our neighborhood. In the spring the moms usually bring their cubs (pups?) to our back slider looking for cat food. I saw a red fox once trotting down the sidewalk in a West Seattle neighborhood one night. I wouldn’t want to mess with wild pigs or bobcats, but I’d put up with them if we could move to Texas.

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  23. One Notch Above a Congresscritter

    February 25th, 2013

    Would them critters be raccoons?

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  24. Bad Brad

    February 25th, 2013

    Urban coons? LOL

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  25. AbigailAdams

    February 25th, 2013

    @ONAC — Yes, they are raccoons, ‘coons for short. I don’t know many people who would take offense at calling a raccoon a ‘coon. You don’t hear people going around calling a ‘coon dog a “raccoon” dog, how ridiculous. That would be like pronouncing “chitterlings” the way it is spelled, instead of chitlin’s.

    Damn cultural Marxism!

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  26. Redgrandma

    February 25th, 2013

    I’d rather have bobcats where I live (downtown Chicago) than the two legged wildlife we normally encounter.

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  27. Panda Garden Chinese Restaraunt

    February 25th, 2013

    I’ll bet there are NO squirrels…or small dogs, or house cats or rabbits either.

    Yeah yeah, it must be the bobcats. That’s it ;)

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  28. Dagney

    February 25th, 2013

    Let’ em bobcats hang around; they’ll scare the muslims !!

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  29. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    Hey Just Al, #1 son lives in Coppell and an officer in Lewisville. That area was a lot of field in early 80s.

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  30. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    “Urban coons? LOL”

    HELL yeah Brad. You should see the size of the packs where they are tolerated/supported. Dozens at a time will come out of a sewer and raid the dumpster or whatever.

    Probably the most frequent large animal I deal with, all inside Big D’s city limits.

    I estimate I’ve caught over 500 in the last 25 years and I’m only one guy.

    Observed over 25 years of trapping for biz and huntng for fun: The city is better for small wildlife than open country. Never a drought with sprnklers and pools. Always food with gardens,fruit & nut trees, pet food outside, GARBAGE. Life easier than out in the wild – by far.

    Wherever the wildlife is the predators will follow.

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  31. Bad Brad

    February 25th, 2013

    Dadof3, Seen em. Those things have been known to coax dogs away from their food, kill the dog in a gang attack and go back for the food. I had a 120 lb, Chesapeake Bay that killed one and had 4 others treed one night. “Urban Coons” Auto word association to Chicago. I know, Racist.

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  32. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    “I don’t know many people who would take offense at calling a raccoon a ‘coon.”

    The local town just north of this story had “The Fightin’ ‘Coons” as their high school mascot until about 10 years ago. Pressure made them change it. Glad they didn’t go too far. Now it’s “The Fightin’ Raccoons”

    So yeah, we even have it here in TX. In spades, if you will.

    Oops, there goes another one!

    Bunch of retards upset over a legit nickname for an animal while calling me a cracker to my face?

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  33. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    The ones around here act like they own the place. I would not want to be cornered by an angry one. Came close twice and they’re still good stories! :D

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  34. Dadof3

    February 25th, 2013

    Stirrin” in Tx, in the city where these are, you are only in trouble for “unlawful discharge of a weapon” in the city. You are allowed “lawful discharges”.

    Shooting an animal to save your life or another’s is a reasonale action. A quick investigation would support your actions. All witnesses present back you up. The fact a dead dangerous animal was there ON YOUR PROPERTY (key) seals the deal.

    Now, hunting them down as they ran down the street is another matter. I’d advise against that. Unless your a knife/sword-wielding ninja type kinda guy on a dirt bike?

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  35. Bad Brad

    February 25th, 2013

    In Cali the neighbors back you up, but you need to employ the 3 S’s. Shoot, Shovel, and Shut Up.

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  36. 1389AD

    February 26th, 2013

    Bobcats, like most other predators (polar bears are the exception), tend to avoid humans. This may be because humans taste/smell bad to predators, or because they regard us as dangerous and figure we’ll kill them. That’s why both bobcats left after they noticed the videographer. As a rule, bobcats won’t be interested in approaching your child.

    That said, you don’t want to leave a tiny child playing outdoors alone without an adult or older child close by. There are plenty of things that could go wrong.

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