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Send Absolutely Securely IS HERE

Home - by - February 7, 2013 - 18:45 America/New_York - 17 Comments

Slate

Meet the groundbreaking new encryption app set to revolutionize privacy and freak out the feds.

“We feel that every citizen has a right to communicate,” Janke says, “the right to send data without the fear of it being grabbed out of the air and used by criminals, stored by governments, and aggregated by companies that sell it.”

For the past few months, some of the world’s leading cryptographers have been keeping a closely guarded secret about a pioneering new invention. Today, they’ve decided it’s time to tell all.

Back in October, the startup tech firm Silent Circle ruffled governments’ feathers with a “surveillance-proof” smartphone app to allow people to make secure phone calls and send texts easily. Now, the company is pushing things even further—with a groundbreaking encrypted data transfer app that will enable people to send files securely from a smartphone or tablet at the touch of a button. (For now, it’s just being released for iPhones and iPads, though Android versions should come soon.)

“This has never been done before,” boasts Mike Janke, Silent Circle’s CEO. “It’s going to revolutionize the ease of privacy and security.”

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I don’t know about you, but I am getting sick and tired of sending an e-mail that happens to have the word “turnip” in it, and then for the next week I get Burpee Seed Packet ads in my g-mail.  Enough.

» 17 Comments

  1. Jethro

    February 7th, 2013

    Hey BFH-
    Thanks to some of the links you tricked me into clicking I get a lot worse things than Burpee ads…

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  2. Tim

    February 7th, 2013

    I thought there was a law that prohibited this sort of thing.

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  3. thirdtwin

    February 7th, 2013

    Tim, there probably was a law passed which was supposed to prohibit that sort of thing, but it had an amendment to permit that sort of thing which was inserted before the final vote, and they passed the law before they saw what was in it. I’m sure they are working on a new law right now.

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  4. thirdtwin

    February 7th, 2013

    I give it three months before there’s an app for that app. Meanwhile, DHS is making a new list.

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  5. eternal cracker p

    February 7th, 2013

    Data encryption has been around for – gawd – decades. Then we get these smarty-tablets and smarty-phones that are so technologically advanced, we need to call them “smart.”

    The latest apps –

    1. You can PRINT (circa 1950s style!)

    2. You can ENCRYPT data (circa 1950s style!)

    Hey – Nothing like progress!

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  6. My life is boring

    February 7th, 2013

    I have no secrets

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  7. Unruly Refugee

    February 7th, 2013

    You won’t know when they figure out how to get around this app until the feds bust down your door.

    The old ways of communication are better if you want privacy.

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  8. Boobie the Rocket Dog

    February 7th, 2013

    Amen. Is he on our side?

    Thumb up +1

     
  9. Racist

    February 7th, 2013

    You think you got issues with scanned email producing unsolicited ads…
    Not long ago I had my Droid laying on the desk in front of me when my oldest son came home from school with a big rip where he had busted out of his tennis shoe, and within 10 minutes I had a steady stream of FootLocker, New Balance, and Nike ads, and 2 offers from Div II Basketball Coaches!!!
    I’m just glad he didn’t mention he had a hole in his tighty-whities…

    Thumb up +4

     
  10. Slate?

    February 7th, 2013

    Bunch a commies

    Thumb up +1

     
  11. Stranded in Sonoma

    February 8th, 2013

    I have a valid question. What if the gov’t gets a legal and constitutional warrant to view or listen to the email, texts, calls, etc? They have a perfect right to the data since they have a warrant. But the only way to get the data is to have the user give them their security key. No key, no data. Remember, you can’t break the lock.

    Or can you? Will Silent Circle give the necessary unlock info the gov’t upon request and a warrant? The gov’t has a compelling interest in obtaining the data and the key is part of that. If a user pays for this security, and I can’t imagine Silent Circle giving this away for free, the customers are entitled to, well…security! If they cave to the gov’t, they’ll go out of business, or only be in business for the gov’t contracts and that will last only until someone invents a better mousetrap for cheaper.

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  12. Unruly Refugee

    February 8th, 2013

    You have a good point there Stranded. Microsoft is supposed to be fixing a back door in all their software just for the nosy feds to use.
    But if you only tell the truth about them in your correspondence, what they read will burn them like water on a witch.

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  13. Mary Jane Anklestraps

    February 8th, 2013

    I use gmail chat now and then. Once, I was bitching about my ex boyfriend by name to a friend and then right in gmail I saw ads for; Geneology, How to know if he’s thinking about leaving you, and background search. Ain’t that some shit?! And fuck you, Google. I left HIM.

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  14. bob

    February 8th, 2013

    Can’t encrypt the drone looking over your shoulder from 10k feet up watching you type.

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  15. Reverend Darkness

    February 8th, 2013

    I work for a company that deals with a lot of DoD level security, and after looking over the article and the developer’s site, I’m seeing some major holes.

    One of the biggest is the use of Symantec’s PGP for encryption. Let me rephrase that: …the use of Huawei Symantec’s PGP. You know Huawei? The company majority owned by the Chinese government? So, we don’t want Google reading our email, but we want to use encryption keys given to us by the Chinese?

    … just sayin’…

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  16. bob

    February 8th, 2013

    Conspiracy theories all have nuggets of truthiness, and one pertinent to this discussion is that there are supposed back doors into windoze and mac, and that all the mainstream “closed source” encryption algorithms have to cough up “back doors”, per se, to the government.

    The truly paranoid will use linux based OS and open source encryption methods that are commonly understood to be uncompromised.

    But, along the lines of what I said above, the weak link in security (be it your own or your organization) is people.

    Why would the feds bother to crack your encryption when they can strong arm your buddy, schmooze your secretary or infiltrate your local Tea Party?

    How many tea parties have feds in them?

    Look up the “hacker” security consultant named Johnny Long. He speaks about social engineering and has made a name for himself.

    Don’t get me wrong, encryption is a good idea…..

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  17. Tim

    February 8th, 2013

    I wasn’t being flippant.

    Back when the 256 bit encryption debate was raging, the Feds wanted it linmited to 128 bits and the key on file.

    The most secure encryption cannot stand up to torture of the individual who knows the key.

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