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“…for dessert I’ll have the Mud Pie.”

Home - by - January 30, 2013 - 18:10 America/New_York - 17 Comments

from That’s Nerdalicious!

Japanese Restaurant Offering Food Made With Dirt

dirt-salad

A Tokyo-based French restaurant called ” Ne Quittez Pas” (“Please Don’t Leave”) decided to turn dirt into a $110 delicacy by offering a “dirt course” consisting of a potato starch and dirt soup, salad with dirt dressing, aspic made with oriental clams and a top layer of sediment, a dirt risotto with sauteed sea bass, dirt gratin, and dirt ice cream.

Rocket News recently tested the food and described the taste as “delicious” and “divine”, noting that a dirt flavor was absent. However, the obvious question is whether this stuff is safe to eat. According to Saeko Torii, a rep from the dirt manufacturer Protoleaf, “the dirt is called Kuro Tsuchi and it’s volcanic ashes mixed with soil and plants from the Kanto District in Japan. It has good bacteria, healthy minerals, and is natural and pure.” But that likely won’t help dirt food land on U.S. menus.

Dirt isn’t regulated for human consumption so it’s hard to know the effects it would have on a person,” says Rebecca Scritchfield, a Washington, D.C. based registered dietitian. “Food gets its nutrients from soil, but one does not eat the actual soil. What’s more, countries have different safety regulations—people in Scotland eat sheep brains but that’s not allowed in the U.S. Protoleaf says their soil is safe to consume but is it safe to eat by American standards? We don’t know because we don’t really know what’s in it.

Whatever the case, Japan was recently developing food from human turds, so the use of dirt is actually a step up. Hit this link above for additional pics. ===> MORE

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So, after I’m full from my big dirt dinner I guess I’ll take a dirt nap. ?!?

» 17 Comments

  1. Boobie the Rocket Dog

    January 30th, 2013

    People eat dirt in DC all the time.

    Thumb up +1

     
  2. Chalupa

    January 30th, 2013

    Not exactly eating dirt cheap.

    Thumb up +2

     
  3. Kairn

    January 30th, 2013

    So one must be very careful to annunciate very carefully that they want a third helping, not a turd helping.

    Thumb up +1

     
  4. Bad Brad

    January 30th, 2013

    God made dirt, and dirt don’t hurt.

    Thumb up +1

     
  5. Death_By_Farts

    January 30th, 2013

    Let’s see here…

    Pay big bucks to eat mud at a place called Please Don’t Leave…?

    I’m leaning towards no…

    Thumb up +1

     
  6. Brooke

    January 30th, 2013

    There’s a sucker born every few minutes…

    Thumb up +2

     
  7. Kairn

    January 30th, 2013

    I’m not inclined to eat dirt now that I am grown if I can help it. But my wise grandmother was fully aware many, many decades ago that encouraging little children to go outside to make mud pies was a good thing. To get the mud on their skin and maybe a little bit in their mouths. Because she was aware that dirt had beneficial microbes in it that would help strengthen children’s immune systems.

    So ingesting dirt for health benefits is not a new idea just now discovered and promoted by the Japanese. There is nothing new under the sun (flag) here.

    Thumb up +2

     
  8. Slow Joe Bidet

    January 30th, 2013

    Them Japs had to be good at makin’ something, but mud pies?

    That’s not a big fcuking deal!!!

    Thumb up +1

     
  9. thirdtwin

    January 30th, 2013

    Kairn, you wouldn’t by chance hail from central Georgia would you? Clay-eating used to be common there.

    Thumb up +1

     
  10. Blink

    January 30th, 2013

    Who do you blame for this? The Japanese or the French?
    Oh wait. There was that video posted a while back of the Japanese gal falling face first in to a pool of mud.

    Thumb up +1

     
  11. Claudia

    January 30th, 2013

    I think I’ll take my pet rock to that restaurant.

    Ahhhhh, no, wait. That would be cannibalism, now wouldn’t it?

    Thumb up 0

     
  12. Kairn

    January 30th, 2013

    Third Twin,
    Not from Georgia. Grew up in Calif. My wise grandmother was raised in Calif too. Although her family originally hailed from the Midwest. She didn’t encourage clay eating directly. She simply believed that you need to let little kids be little kids. Let them play in the dirt and mud. Exposing children to dirt at a young age is actually a good thing to do.

    She didn’t care if we got covered with dirt and mud. We got plunked into her magnificent old claw foot tub for a good scrubbing before dinner. So my siblings and I were pretty healthy kids growing up. Thanks to a wise grandma.

    Thumb up +2

     
  13. Billy Fuster

    January 30th, 2013

    Dirt has feelings too.

    Thumb up +1

     
  14. Chip Kale

    January 30th, 2013

    When I was growing up I accidentally swallowed an appleseed. Mom scared me by saying it would sprout inside me.

    The fact that it didn’t is probably because
    I DIDN”T EAT ENOUGH DIRT!

    Thumb up +2

     
  15. DaveVA

    January 30th, 2013

    @Chip Kale…now that is funny

    Thumb up +1

     
  16. Bad Brad

    January 30th, 2013

    Chip, Your mom’s was right. You were concentrating on it growing out of your mouth.

    Thumb up 0

     
  17. JimBob

    January 30th, 2013

    I have to get mad to make someone eat dirt.

    Thumb up 0