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Stalin’s birthday marked in Russia and beyond

Home - by - December 23, 2012 - 11:00 America/New_York - 19 Comments

SacBee

Georgia Stalin's birthday

 

TBILISI, Georgia – People across the vast territory where Josef Stalin once imposed his terror have marked the 133rd anniversary of the dictator’s birth, some in hatred but others in reverence.

In Moscow, several hundred Russian Communists led by their leader Gennady Zuyganov laid flowers at Stalin’s grave at the Red Square Friday, while smaller rallies were held across Russia and several former Soviet republics.

Leftists in neighboring Belarus said they found a Stalin statue that was buried after denunciation of his personality cult in 1956, but refused to specify its whereabouts because they fear authorities will order its destruction. Authorities in Stalin’s hometown of Gori, Georgia, they will reinstall his statue that was removed in 2010.

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» 19 Comments

  1. F.D.R. in Hell

    December 23rd, 2012

    Who hung the mistletoe over Uncle Joe?
    :evil:

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  2. Apple pie

    December 23rd, 2012

    Kissing evil.

    Words fail me…

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  3. Xavier

    December 23rd, 2012

    @F.D.R. in Hell

    You did – and insisted Winston kiss him too.

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  4. Eleanor in Hell

    December 23rd, 2012

    Hey, Franklin, someone knows their history. They didn’t call you the Yaltese Falcon for nothing.
    :roll:

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  5. Nutjob

    December 23rd, 2012

    Any word if Obama will be celebrating or attending any anniversary ceremonies?

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  6. norman einstein

    December 23rd, 2012

    @Eleanor, you crack me up.
    So glad you’ve come out of hiding…or was that purgatory?

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  7. the aardvark

    December 23rd, 2012

    So ol Uncle Joe is making a comeback. What did the commies forget about him that now he is being rehabilitated. If they didn’t get it right when Stalin was alive have they really learned anything about the nature of Stalin’s evil since then? Guess not! And as an aside I was born in the good Old USA on the same day that Stalin died March 4,1953. I am also currently rereading the Gulag Archipelago by Alexander Solzhenitsyn beginning with the first volume of 3.

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  8. Metprof

    December 23rd, 2012

    Can’t wait for Pol Pot day…….

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  9. serfer62

    December 23rd, 2012

    The man who murdered more then 16 million Russian confiscated gun owner ship in Russia

    Now who does that remind you of…

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  10. scribble

    December 23rd, 2012

    @aardvark – read Iron Curtain by Anne Applebaum if you want a peek of what’s in store for us under obama.

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  11. Name Redacted™

    December 23rd, 2012

    Stalin was born in the country of Georgia, which became part of the USSR.

    After the breakup of the Soviet Union, Georgia became one of our best allies. President Saakashvili is a fervent fan of Ronald Reagan and had a statue of him set up in Tbilisi (http://www.civil.ge/eng/article.php?id=24178). Unfortunately, Saakashvili has lost power and the opposition power that will soon take control is going to turn everything back to shit.

    “Georgia rebuilds Stalin monuments to shut up Saakashvili”
    http://rt.com/art-and-culture/news/stalin-monuments-georgia-rebuilt-574/

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  12. scr_north

    December 23rd, 2012

    Righhhhht. So this guy is tongue kissing a bird crap covered statue of the world’s greatest mass murderer. Ok, maybe they were depressed when today’s Stalin (albeit a pale imitation) Putin and the boys kicked them in the slats in 2008. I guess they’re trying to raise the spectre of one vampire to battle another one.

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  13. Geoff C. The Saltine

    December 23rd, 2012

    We don’t have Stalin here yet, but we have the next best thing.
    http://arfarfarf.com/fremont/lenin_statue.php

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  14. Cactiki

    December 23rd, 2012

    I am also re-reading The Gulag Archipeligo. I am on book 3. I discovered volume one on my dad’s bookshelf when I was a teenager, and was astounded how I had never been taught the evilness of Lenin and Stalin in school. Now at age 51 I think I know why I wasn’t taught about it- they didn’t want us to know! I got my teenage son to read it, and I honestly think everyone should read it. Here are some quotations I have saved:
    “Orachevsky had been given only fiye years. He had been imprisoned for a facial crime (really out of Orwell)—for a smile.”
    “A tailor laying aside his needle stuck it into a newspaper on the wall so it wouldn’t get lost and happened to stick it in ^e eye of a portrait of Kaganovich. A customer observed this: Article 58, ten years (terrorism)
    “The charge against Grigory Yefimbvich Generalov, from Smolensk Province, was that .he “used to idrink heavily because he hated the Soviet government.” (And actually he used to drink heavily because he and his wife got along badly.) He got eight years.”
    “If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?”

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  15. Name Redacted™

    December 23rd, 2012

    The sad thing is that these countries have not been able to make a good go of freedom and capitalism, because capitalism requires a Judeo-Christian value system and strong personal character. They had religion banished from their lives, and now they have no sense of personal accountability to offset the temptations of greed, corruption, and torturous abuse. These problems have arisen along with capitalism, and many of the people are not better off, and now look back to the “good old days” when their government had their lives ordered.

    The USSR used to be a superpower, and the people miss those days. Russia is back on the move. Things are going to get depressing.

    Imagine how we Americans are going to feel after the U.S. loses its power and influence. Or maybe what we’re feeling right now. It causes us to look back to our Founding Fathers, those who had the ideas and took the action to bring us to greatness.

    That’s what’s happening in the minds of the people of the former USSR. Hence Stalin’s growing popularity. If you want to see what people are thinking, look at the comment section of the article from RT that I linked above. So sad. What we’ve had here in the U.S. has been truly unique in history, impossible to duplicate elsewhere with different people and cultures. It truly was a miracle in history.

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  16. cfm990

    December 23rd, 2012

    I don’t know which way He’d be facing. But Obama would definitely be on his knees.

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  17. Jorel Lives!

    December 23rd, 2012

    @Name Redacted

    Love your comment. Coincidentally on that same train of thought, that theme is justified in that we are “unique.” One example is more Christian missionaries are sent out into the world from America than any other country: to help the poor and preach the gospel. From my personal History Journal several days ago:

    De Tocqueville (Democracy in America) saw that religion in America was in harmony with the state, unlike Europe whereas the church and state were in a perpetual struggle. To quote, “Religion…must be regarded as the foremost of the political institutions of the country for if it does not impart a taste for freedom, it facilitates the use of free institutions.” Also, he was strong on the idea of religion in the republican sphere as a form of maintenance.

    We go, and there will definitely be less light in the world. And we all know here. Scary.

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  18. Genl Ripper

    December 23rd, 2012

    Josef Vissarionovich Dzugashvili is easily in the Top Five of the most murderous people in modern times

    Not for nothing but ALL of the Most Murderous Leaders in modern times were leftists/ socialists/ communists. It’s an ideology that is inherently evil.

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  19. Name Redacted

    December 24th, 2012

    @Jorel – so true.

    An interesting thing about missionaries: I believe during the 19th century it was Great Britain that was the hub of missionary work throughout the world. Of course, the Left will lump them in with the “empiricists,” but really, Christianity was really a going concern with our English friends not so long ago. Look at them now. They have, for the most part, given up their God along with their empire, and after bringing us the world’s greatest body of literature and some of the greatest minds in Christian thought (most recently G.K. Chesterton and C.S. Lewis), they are nobodies who bring the world what? Richard Dawkins?

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